Starch Adhesives

In this context the starch referred to is the powder that is used to stiffen the collars of cotton shirts. In North America this is known as cornstarch.

Spoerri
Water
Starch
Hydrochloric acid, conc.
100 mL
3 g
0.2 mL
Suspend the starch in 30 mL of the water. Bring the remaining 70 mL water to the boil and add it to the starch suspension. Add the hydrochloric acid and boil the mixture for 5 minutes. Cool.
McDowell and Vassos
Water
Starch
10% Hydrochloric acid
Thymol
90 mL
3 g
0.5 mL
Crystal
Suspend the starch in 30 mL of the water. Bring the remaining 60 mL water to the boil and add it to the starch suspension. Add the hydrochloric acid and boil the mixture for 5 minutes. Cool, and add a small crystal of thymol.

The two formulas above are very similar, and there is little to choose between them. Both are effective, but it must be remembered that starches are oxidised by several agents to aldehydes, which will then be stained in some procedures. Methods such as PAS, Jones, Grocott' methenamine silver and other, similar techniques, will give visible background staining and should be avoided.

To use, spread a small amount of the starch paste onto a slide, but be careful not to use too much. Float out on a waterbath as usual. Pick up the section on the starched slide and bake on as usual. Starch adhesives have the reputation of being effective and may hold tissues on the slide when albumen is not successful.

 

Reference
Gray, Peter. (1954)
The Microtomist's Formulary and Guide.
Originally published by:– The Blakiston Co.
Republished by:– Robert E. Krieger Publishing Co.
  Citing:–
    Spoerri, (1939)
    Science. v. 90, p. 260
    New York, USA.
  And:–
    McDowell and Vassos (1940)
    Archiv für pathologische Anatomie, v. 29, p. 432
    Bratislava, Germany.

Steedman, H.F., (1960)
Section cutting in microscopy
Blackwell Scientific Publications, Oxford, UK.


 
Translate in
Google Translate
Instructions